Traffic was heavier Tuesday morning, the second weekday commute since the closure of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)
Traffic was heavier Tuesday morning, the second weekday commute since the closure of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Live updates: Some delays but no crises on day 3 of the post-viaduct commute

We're posting live updates during the third commuting day since the Alaskan Way Viaduct was permanently shut down. Seattle Times journalists will provide coverage from various spots in the city.

Politics

How your U.S. lawmaker voted

Here’s how area members of Congress voted on major issues during the legislative week ending May 3.

Featured Video Stories

Project Homeless is a new Seattle Times initiative that explores and explains the region’s complex, troubling problem of homelessness. With strong watchdog reporting and vivid storytelling, Project Homeless seeks to spotlight what is working, and what is not working, in responding to homelessness. We will also feature solutions-oriented reporting from elsewhere in the country.

About Education Lab

Education Lab is a Seattle Times project that spotlights promising approaches to some of the most persistent challenges in public education.

Health

As states pass restrictive abortion laws, questions surface

ATLANTA (AP) — As multiple states pass laws banning many abortions, questions have surfaced about what exactly that means for women who might seek an abortion. The short answer: nothing yet. Governors in Kentucky , Mississippi , Ohio and Georgia have recently approved bans on abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can happen...  VIEW

Environment

The search for a monster — or whatever lurks in an Alaska lake

Fishermen have tried hooking it. The Anchorage Daily News once offered $100,000 for proof of its existence. But so far, nobody has photographed the creature some call the Iliamna Lake monster.

Science

Flooding makes big ‘dead zone’ off Louisiana coast likely

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The year's widespread flooding has made it likely that a big, oxygen-starved "dead zone" off Louisiana's coast will form this summer, the head of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science said Thursday. Preliminary computer model runs "indicate a large to very large year," for the area where there's too little...